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Healthy Living for Healthy Eyes

Everyone probably tells you to eat healthy, exercise, and spend time away from the screen. Sure, it’s good for your health, but does it help your eyes? Absolutely! Here are a few key areas of healthy living that are also essential to your healthy eyes and vision.

>Healthy Diet

To help keep your eyes healthy, make sure to load up on nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids, lutein, zinc, and vitamins c and e. Foods like green leafy vegetables, salmon or other oily fish, eggs and nuts, oranges, and pork contain these essential nutrients. Additionally, the vitamins and minerals found in these foods can help prevent many age-related problems such as macular degeneration and cataracts.

A well-balanced diet also helps maintain a healthy weight. Generally speaking, when you eat healthily and are at a lower risk of obesity, you have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the leading cause of blindness in adults.

>Exercise

Exercise also impacts your eye health. By simply going for a walk, you can significantly lower the chances of developing cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. When someone develops glaucoma, doctors usually treat it by lowering high intra-ocular pressure. Recent research has implicated that, by exercising, you can reduce the pressure in your eye, helping to lower your risk for glaucoma.

Staying Hydrated

Staying hydrated is another critical factor to consider in keeping your eyes healthy. When you don’t drink enough water, your body’s instinct is to conserve it in any way that it can. This conservation includes altering your eyes! Your body will decrease the number of tears produced when it doesn’t have enough water. When this happens, you may develop symptoms of dry eye or eye strain. So what can you do? Drink water! The average water intake per day is about eight, 8-ounce glasses of water, but make sure to consume more during warmer weather or intense exercise.

Habits to Avoid

There are a few bad habits most individuals do that are bad for your eyes.

Rubbing Your Eyes

First, make sure you don’t rub your eyes! Rubbing your eyes can break blood vessels under eyelids, causing bloodshot eyes or dark circles that make you look tired.

Overusing Eye Drops

Another problem that you may not realize is the overuse of eye drops. While eye drops may temporarily soothe your eyes, overusing them may cause your eyes to become irritated over time.

Do you have more questions about ways your lifestyle can help your eyes? Contact our office today and ask us your vision questions!

5 Reasons Eye Exams Are Important

Your eyes allow you to interact with the world around you every day and are a vital part of your daily life. By taking care of your eyes today, you are ensuring you will see your best for years to come. Let’s take a closer look at five reasons why routine eye exams are so important.

  1. Eye exams help children succeed in school.
  2. Myopia is becoming more common.
  3. Vision screenings should never substitute a yearly comprehensive eye exam.
  4. Glaucoma does not present symptoms in the early stages.
  5. Annual eye exams can help detect other health issues.

Eye Exams and School

During a child’s schooling, 80% of the information presented for learning requires good vision. By scheduling a yearly comprehensive eye exam, you are ensuring your child sees clearly and comfortably in the classroom. Even more, an eye exam is the only way to know for sure if your child is able to see their best for sports and other activities.

Reducing Myopia Progression

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is being diagnosed more than ever before, and at an earlier age, too. Children who become nearsighted early in life tend to experience a worsening progression of nearsightedness throughout childhood. This progression puts them at a higher risk of developing cataracts, glaucoma, and retinal detachment later in life.

By scheduling a routine eye exam, your doctor can evaluate your risks of developing myopia. When detected early, you and your eye doctor can dramatically slow the progression of myopia and decrease the chances of developing eye problems down the road.

Vision Screenings Vs. Comprehensive Eye Exams

While commonly provided, a vision screening test is not a replacement for a yearly routine eye exam. Vision screening tests only look to see if a vision problem exists. These tests cannot diagnose the vision problem you have but are able to signify a larger exam is needed. During a comprehensive eye exam, your optometrist will perform tests that evaluate your vision and eye health.

As you age, your risk of eye problems also increase. Routine eye exams are essential to detecting eye-related issues when merely getting a vision screening would not.

Reducing Your Risk of Glaucoma

Many people who develop glaucoma often don’t show symptoms at first. These individuals usually develop vision loss before they have learned that something is wrong with their eyes. This type of vision loss is irreversible if caught too late. With a routine exam, your optometrist can detect high eye pressure and other early signs of glaucoma before any serious damage to your vision occurs.

Detecting Issues During Your Annual Eye Exam

An eye exam can detect other health-related issues such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and even cancer. During your exam, your eye doctor will evaluate the health and condition of the blood vessels in your retina, which are predictors of the health of blood vessels throughout your entire body. By scheduling a yearly comprehensive eye exam, you can reduce your risk for diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia.

So do you want to take a burden off of your eyes? Contact our office today and ask our staff any questions that you might have about scheduling your eye exam.

Non-Glare Lenses: A Necessity

Non-Glare Lenses: A Necessity

If you wear glasses, you might notice the difference between lenses that have an anti-reflective coating from those that don’t. Anti-reflective coating, or non-glare lenses not only improve your vision but help reduce eye strain and makes your eyeglasses look more attractive.

What exactly are non-glare lenses?

Anti-reflective, or non-glare glasses work to eliminate the reflections from the front and back surface of your eyeglass lenses, which allows more light to pass through. This increase in light improves your vision’s clarity and minimizes the glare from objects, especially at night or while staring at a screen.

What benefits do non-glare lenses have?

With clearer vision through your lenses, you won’t need to squint or strain your eyes as much, minimizing eye strain and fatigue. These lenses also provide you with more durability and typically last longer.

Anti-reflective glasses are also more visually attractive. Since light will not reflect through your lenses, your eyes will be more visible and allow you to make better eye contact – important in both social and professional settings.

Non-glare on RX eyewear and Sunwear

Anti-reflective coating is useful for sunglasses because it protects you and your eyes from the glare of the sunlight. Usually, an AR coating is only put on the backside of sunglass lenses because there aren’t any benefits from eliminating the glare from the front of your glasses.

Who could benefit?

You see clearer while wearing them, enhance your appearance, extend the life of your lenses, and reduce blue light exposure. With all of the benefits non-glare glasses offer, anyone could benefit from investing in anti-reflective glasses.

Other Questions?

Contact our office today with questions you have about the possibility of adding an anti-reflective coating on your glasses.

The Basics of LASIK

If you live an active lifestyle, wearing prescription glasses or contacts can, at times, feel like a nuisance. But you can’t go without them, right? Not necessarily. It’s time you learned about the benefits of LASIK!

The benefits of LASIK

As the most commonly performed laser eye surgery, LASIK reshapes your cornea to allow light that enters the eye to focus on the retina for better vision. The surgery usually takes about 15 minutes for both eyes, can leave you walking out the door with your glasses left behind.

What to Expect

Immediately after the procedure, you may feel a temporary burning or itching sensation that can cause blurry vision. These side effects are only temporary and should improve by the next morning. Always follow the care instructions set by your doctor in order to have a successful procedure. Although there are cases where you may still need to wear your prescription glasses or contact lenses, most people will achieve 20/20 vision or better after having LASIK.

So are you the right candidate for LASIK?

Generally, there are a few things that you must consider before determining whether or not LASIK is right for you.

  • Your eyes must be healthy–if you have any condition that might affect how your eyes respond to surgery or heal afterward, you must wait until that condition is resolved.
  • Because LASIK reshapes your cornea, it’s also essential to determine whether or not your cornea is the right thickness to undergo this procedure.
  • Your prescription must be within certain limits; if your prescription is too high, it may not be wise to undergo LASIK.

Because everyone’s needs and personal circumstances are different, talk to your doctor to see if he/she believes you’re a good fit for this procedure.

Want to learn more about LASIK? Give our office a call or ask our staff your questions at your next appointment. Our team is prepared to help you choose the right vision management options for your lifestyle.

What is the Right Age for Contact Lenses?

Children today are developing myopia sooner than in the past. Myopia, or nearsightedness, results in prescription glasses or contact lenses. Many parents might prefer the traditional frame over having their child wear contact lenses. But, the same question crosses through a lot of minds: contact lenses for children – what is the right age?

The answer depends on the eye doctor.

The right age for contact lenses

In a recent study, 51% of eye doctors surveyed felt the earliest age to prescribe contact lenses is 10, while only 12% felt 8 is a good time to introduce them.

67% of eye doctors felt if your child is younger than eight years old, they should stick to a traditional frame. But as your child gets older, the introduction of contact lenses becomes more prevalent. 66% of eye doctors recommended contact lenses as the primary vision correction method for children between the ages of 15-17.

For eye doctors that prescribe contact lenses at an earlier age, most say they prescribe daily disposable lenses for ease of use and maintenance.

Reasons for contacts

Two out of five optometrists say that many parents request their child be fit to wear contact lenses because their child refuses to wear glasses, or the frames interfere with sports or even their daily activities.

Many young people feel more confident wearing contacts. Some kids feel self-conscious in glasses. For children active in sports, contact lenses offer added convenience and safety. If. Sport contact lenses can eliminate the chance that their glasses break or cause injury. They provide other benefits as well, such as better peripheral vision since there is no frame in the way.

Do you want to take the next steps in ensuring your child has options with his or her vision? Contact our office with any questions.

FAQ: Dry Eye Syndrome

What is dry eye syndrome?

Dry eye syndrome is caused by your eyes not producing enough lubricant to keep the surface of your eyes moist. You may experience a burning and aching sensation, heavy and itchy eyes, sore and dry sensation, and blurred vision. Dry eye syndrome is a common eye condition, and if you are a female, aging, and use the computer often, you are at a higher risk.

What causes it?

So what exactly causes dry eye? Your eye’s tears contain three components: an oily component, a water component, and a mucous-like component. Each of the three plays an essential role in helping the tears in your eyes from evaporating too quickly. A problem with any of the tear components can result in dry eye syndrome.

Many factors can increase the chances of developing dry eye. If you use a computer, it’s normal not to blink as much, which leads to more of the liquids in your eyes evaporating, increasing the risk of developing dry eyes. You are also more likely to develop dry eye after the age of 50.

Another factor that increases the risk of developing dry eye syndrome is heavy use of air conditioning and forced-air heating because they lower the amount of humidity in the room, speeding tear evaporation. Smoking also causes various problems for the eyes, such as dry eye, macular degeneration, and cataracts.

How is it treated?

If you believe that you have dry eyes, contact your eye doctor. Your eye doctor will look at your medical history to see if medications or environmental factors may be making your eyes worse. Your doctor may also look at your eyelid structure and evaluate your blinking pattern to see if it is contributing to your dry eyes.

There is treatment available for dry eye syndrome, and your doctor may suggest using artificial tears while also implementing small lifestyle changes, such as taking breaks from using a computer.

If you have any of the symptoms of dry eye syndrome, contact our office today! We are ready to answer all of your questions and help you with all of your vision care needs.

Your Guide to Choosing the Perfect Eyewear

Many people with medical eye diseases don’t show symptoms immediately, but with an underlying disease, the damage is already underway. Regular comprehensive eye exams are essential in diagnosing eye diseases early.

Comprehensive Eye Exams Diagnose Medical Eye Disease

By not getting a comprehensive eye exam on a regular basis, you’re putting your eyes at risk because once symptoms show, it might be too late for effective treatment. If detected early, your eye doctor can help treat and improve your vision.

An eye exam can reveal health conditions unrelated to your eyes. During an eye exam, your eye doctor can evaluate the health of the blood vessels in your retina and help predict the overall health of the blood throughout your body. Diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia can all appear during a routine eye exam

Common Eye Diseases

Refractive Errors

Refractive errors are the most commonly diagnosed eye disorder in, Let’s face it; with our busy lives, multiple hobbies, and everything in between, having multiple pairs of eyewear handy is a necessity. Have you ever gone to pick out new eyeglasses but were too overwhelmed by all of your options, though? Listed below are a few things to keep in mind when choosing eyewear that’s perfect for you.

Choosing Eyewear Style

Depending on your look, you may find it necessary to have a pair of glasses that are complementary. A night out on the town is going to require a more stylish frame than what you need for work. Having different styles of glasses can help remove the dilemma of having a pair that doesn’t match the occasion by giving you situation-specific options.

Choosing Eyewear Size

To see what size frame fits best with your face, you might have to try on multiple pairs. If the frames are too small, they may feel tight on your head and restrict your peripheral vision, or they may pinch your nose and leave red marks. But if they are too big, they may slide down your nose and slip off your face. To get the perfect fit, you can adjust the tightness around your ears.

Investing in Protection

Your standard eyeglass options may not adapt and darken in reaction to sunlight–unless you have photochromic lenses–so it may be smart to invest in a pair of prescription sunglasses to protect your eyes. Polarized lenses are a good option because the tint applies to your specific sport or hobby.

Your face shape

Your eyewear should contrast your face shape but also be in scale with your face size. Below are common face shapes and recommended frame shape:

  • Oval: wide or walnut-shaped frames
  • Base-up triangle: frames with a wider bottom, light color or lightweight
  • Oblong: frames with more depth than width
  • Square: narrow frames and with more width than depth
  • Diamond: cat-eye shaped frames or other detailing on the brow line
  • Round: narrow frames which are wider and have a clear bridge
  • Base-down triangle: frames with color or detailing on the top half

Weight and material

Eyeglasses are constructed from different materials: plastic, metal, or a combination of materials. Depending on the material you choose, the weight, flexibility, and cost of your eyeglasses will vary.

  • Metal Frames: these frames have adjustable nose pads, can come in hypoallergenic
  • materials and last longer
  • Plastic Frames: these frames are lighter and are usually less expensive. Plastic frames also require less maintenance than metal frames

Do you have other questions about choosing eyewear? Schedule an appointment with us to find the perfect pair! The United States. Myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism (distorted vision), and presbyopia (loss of the ability to focus up close) are all refractive errors that can be corrected if diagnosed early. Early symptoms of a refractive error include seeing a glare around bright lights, having to squint, and having double vision.

Contact Lenses for Hard-to-Fit Eyes

If you have astigmatism, dry eyes, or keratoconus, you may have a harder time finding contact lenses work for you. Specialty contact lenses may be the answer.

Specialty contact lenses for keratoconus

This condition occurs when your cornea thins and forms into a cone-like shape, causing your vision to become distorted and your eyes more sensitive to light. If you have this condition, you may see better with contact lenses that replace the irregular shape of the cornea with a smooth surface, allowing light to focus better on the retina.

Gas permeable contact lenses

For those with mild to moderate keratoconus, gas-permeable contact lenses may help. They are made with an oxygen-permeable material and keep their shape instead of fitting the cornea. These lenses reduce blur and help provide sharper vision than glasses.

Piggybacking contact lenses

People who use gas permeable lenses may find the rigid lenses uncomfortable to wear at length. In this case, “piggybacking”- wearing a soft contact lens under the gas permeable lens – may be an alternative. The two lenses work together for vision and comfort.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is a difference in the shape of the cornea that makes it harder for the eyes to focus on light, which results in blurred vision.

Toric contact lenses

These lenses provide comfort without a period of having to break in the lenses. This option is more complicated because it takes more time to fit than the traditional soft lenses. They are designed specifically for your eyes, and can be pricey.

Contact lenses for dry eyes

Dry eyes are a common issue, and they make it uncomfortable to wear contact lenses. If you have dry eyes and still want to wear contacts, soft contacts help hold in the moisture in your eyes.

Specialty lenses and giant papillary conjunctivitis

This eye condition causes inflammation in the mucous membrane that covers the white part of your eye. Known as pink eye, this condition is caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi.

Your eye doctor may take different routes with contacts if you have GPC. They may recommend soft and disposable contact lenses that are worn throughout the day and then thrown away.

Lenses for presbyopia

Presbyopia occurs when you lose the ability to focus on objects up close, and your eye doctor may recommend bifocal or monovision contact lenses. These lenses are challenging to fit and require more time and money to get it right. If fit correctly, bifocal or monovision lenses can provide many benefits.

Do you have more questions about the specialty contact lenses you can use for your lifestyle? Contact our office today and ask us your vision questions!

Children and Myopia Control

Today, Myopia presents itself at an earlier age in more children than in the past. Studies have shown that part of the increase in nearsightedness is because more people are doing work up close; this isn’t just a computer and increased screen time, though–reading for long periods can also impact your eyes.

There are four options your eye doctor may use for myopia control in children.

Atropine Eye Drops

Myopia occurs when your eye is too long, or your cornea is too curved. The light that enters your eye has a harder time focusing the way it should, and this results in blurred vision. When you use atropine eye drops, you’re temporarily dilating your pupil, which relaxes your eyes’ focusing ability, making it easier to see. The recommended dosage is .01. At this dosage, side effects typically are not noticeable.

Multifocal Contacts

The primary use of multifocal contacts is to help achieve clear vision at all distances. According to studies, children who wore multifocal contacts had a 50% reduction in the advancement of Myopia compared to children who stuck with traditional soft contacts.

Multifocal Eyeglasses

Like multifocal contacts, multifocal eyeglasses intend to help you gain a clearer vision regardless of the distance. These glasses have two parts, one being the top, which allows you to see objects far away. The second part is on the bottom of your lenses and assists when you read. These glasses slow the progression of Myopia.

Do you want to take the next steps in ensuring your child has full potential regarding his/her vision? Contact our office today to ask our staff any questions you have about your child’s next appointment.

Five Types of Eyewear Everyone Needs!

Your day-to-day tasks change, so the glasses you need will vary. Below are five types of eyewear everyone needs!

Computer Eyewear

The average person spends about eight hours looking at their computer a day, and this often results in tired and strained eyes. Computer eyewear helps alleviate the eye strain that is associated with staring at a computer screen for extended periods. There are three options when it comes to this type of eyewear:

Single Vision Computer Eyewear: used to reduce blurred vision and help alleviate eye strain and poor posture

Occupational Progressive Lenses: a multifocal lens that corrects near, intermediate, and distance vision

Occupational Bifocal Lenses: higher zone and improved vision for intermediate and near vision

Computer eyewear comes with many benefits, including clearer vision and a reduction in the need to strain your eyes and back.

Photochromic Lenses

It’s essential to protect your eyes outside, but it can be inconvenient to switch between eyeglasses and sunglasses. With photochromic lenses, you can protect your eyes without having to switch between frames. They are clear while you are inside but darken when exposed to ultraviolet light. Even on an overcast day, your photochromic lenses will protect your eyes from the sun’s UV rays.

Polarized Eyewear

With polarized lenses, you can prevent the glare from sunlight reflecting off of surfaces and into your eyes. These lenses can be helpful in many situations which boating, fishing, going to the beach, and even driving.

Safety Glasses

It might be worth looking into glasses strictly meant for protecting your eyes. This eyewear–often in the form of safety glasses, sports goggles, or shooting glasses–is durable and useful for protecting your eyes and providing more coverage than typical lenses.

Fashion Eyewear

Depending on the look you are going for, you may find it necessary to have a pair of glasses complementing the look. A night out on the town is going to require a more stylish frame than what you need for work. Having different styles of glasses can help remove the dilemma of having a pair that doesn’t match the occasion by giving you situation-specific options.

Do you want to take the next steps in getting eyewear for all occasions? Contact our office today to ask our staff any questions you have about these types of eyewear.